Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Spring

Douglas Iris

What flower do you most associate with Spring?  Crocuses, daffodils, poppies?  It probably depends where you live, or where you grew up.  For me, a native Californian, nothing say “Spring” like the Douglas Iris (Iris douglasiana).  It usually grows under a foot tall, but it packs a lot of beauty, especially when you find a large clump of them blooming together.  Its dark green leaves and deep purple flowers are a dramatic combo.

Happy Spring to all my northern hemisphere readers (and happy Fall to all of you on the southern half of our planet)!

Advertisements

Yellow Flowers

A wall of bright yellow wildflowers stopped me in my tracks.  Even the seed pods were dramatic!  Granted, yellow is a cheerful color in and of itself, but on the flowers of this plant which appeared to be growing and blooming with nothing short of wild abandon…wow!

I was smitten!

white clematis vine

While English ivy can be lovely climbing up a brick wall, I’d much rather have a clematis vine on mine.  These lovely white flowers, several inches across, with their delicate yellow centers, manage to look dramatic and dainty at the same time.

This is a white anemone clematis (Clematis montana var. grandiflora).  It even manages to have a beautiful scientific name!  And as you can see, it’s a prolific bloomer.

I think I’m in love!

Forsythia

We’re looking down a row of attention-grabbing forsythia bushes during the peak of their springtime bloom.  When covered with flowers, they take the prize for the most cheerful bushes I’ve ever seen.  Bright daffodil-yellow blossoms attached to dark orange branches, with a smattering of brand new green leaves just beginning to sprout…there’s nothing shy or retiring about this bush.  It’s a far cry from mellow;  au contraire, it screams “Look at ME!”

red azaelas

I just love how this tree trunk is completely surrounded by boisterous red azaleas in full bloom!  Isn’t it great that there are plants that will grow and bloom their hearts out in the shade?  Camelias and rhodies are two other species that are shade loving and prolific bloomers.

spring flowers

Why pick flowers when you can have a living bouquet like this?

orange tulips open

As tulips bloom, they open further and further.  Eventually they loose their “classic” tulip shape and become larger and flatter.  I love the way you can see all the detail in their petals, stamens, etc.  Mulit-hued tulips like these are especiallly beautiful when fully open, since you can see the color variations on the edges of the petals so much better.

Past their prime?  I think not!

Perhaps this IS their prime…

What do you think?

 

red tulips

Is it okay to yell “Fire!” in a crowded flowerbed?  These could well be the “hottest” tulips I’ve ever seen…

colorful spring flowers

Just about every color of the rainbow is represented in this flower bed, except for true red.  But there’s red-orange, orange-orange, salmon, soft pink, bright yellow, various greens, blue and purple.  And white, depending on whether you consider it a color or not.  White is sort of the Pluto of colors…

I’m fascinated by synesthesia.  Synesthesia is a blending together of the senses.  There are some people who can taste colors and smell sounds and so forth.

If any of you are lucky enough to have the type of synesthesia where you can HEAR colors, I’d love to know if this flower bed sounds more like cacophony (discordant noise) or more like a symphony (harmonious sounds blended together).

And those of you with plain old vision-vision (like me), how does it appear to you?  Is it a cacophony of color, or a pleasing blend of hues and shapes and textures?

Personally, I like the way some colors are mixed together and others are grouped in monochromatic blobs.  There’s simultaneously both order and disorder, organization and chaos.

Kind of like my office…

tulips and pansies

Wouldn’t this be a beautiful design for a carpet?  Hot orange tulips with bright yellow centers scattered among a bed of cool blue pansies…magic indeed!