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Tag Archives: Mountain

Waterfalls

What is the upside of a long and heavy downpour?  Photographically, I can think of at least two:  waterfalls and rainbows.  After a heavy rain, dozens of waterfalls were streaming down the steep volcanic cliffs of Moloka’i.  As the clearing storm clouds cast continually changing shadow patterns on the mountainside, I marveled at the sight.  Within a day or two, most of these waterfalls would disappear.  But for a while, each crevice of basalt was highlighted with a bright white ribbon of water following the path of least resistance.

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Slope Mtn 2

If ever there was a mountain that was aptly named, it has to be Slope Mountain.  Located in Lake Clark National Park, Alaska, its unique profile dominates the landscape…when the top isn’t hidden by clouds, that is.

My primary purpose in visiting this area was to photograph grizzlies, and that I did, but I couldn’t help sneaking in the occasional landscape shot, especially when the weather was so cooperative.

The other time I would turn to landscape photography was when the bears couldn’t be found.  Just because our itinerary had “bear viewing and photography” written on it, sometimes the bears had other plans.  Our guide knew the bears’ habits and where the critters were LIKELY to be at different times of the day, but that was never a guarantee that we would find any.

More often than not we did find bears, grazing, clamming, napping, nursing, bathing, playing and doing all of those cool bear things…but a couple of times we got skunked.

Fortunately the scenery was pretty, with or without bears in it.

Slope Mtn

The title of this post can refer either to the experience of gazing upon a massive mountain top…or the fact that said mountain was once at the bottom of the sea!

The sedimentary layers that make up this mountain were layed down millions of years ago, possible from the erosion of an even more ancient mountain, and then the entire formation rose at an intriguing angle, much faster on one side than the other…

Today, this mountain is eroding as well, and creeks and rivers carry its sediment into the nearby ocean.

Someday in the distant future, millions of years from now, this mountain will form new sedimentary layers at the bottom of the sea, and eventually those will sink and then rise into yet another mountain…

It’s recycling on a grand scale!

Fireweed meadow

If you’ve been to Alaska, and maybe even if you haven’t, you’ll recognize this as a pretty typical landscape:  a meadow filled with fireweed in the foreground, and mountains in the background.

This is not meant to be at all disparaging:  the scenery is lovely, even without any wildlife in the image.

This is a place that feeds the soul and the senses on many different levels simultaneously.

I can’t wait to go back!